Nuclear Doomsday Clock- Trigged by «Genius» MAD (Monstrous Atomic Drop Out) People!

Pentagon Rebuked for Draft Suggesting Nuclear Response to Cyber Attacks

With new nuclear policy draft, the Pentagon is «winding the Doomsday Clock in the wrong direction.»

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A new policy draft from the Pentagon suggests the use of nuclear weapons by the U.S. in the event of non-nuclear attacks—a huge departure from decades of nuclear policy. (Photo: Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

Anti-nuclear advocates on Wednesday denounced a draft Pentagon report pushing the use of nuclear weapons by the United States to respond to non-nuclear attacks—a major departure from the policy that’s been in place for decades.

The draft Nuclear Posture Review expands the definition of the «extreme circumstances» in which the U.S. could use nuclear force, notably suggesting that such weapons could be used in the event of cyber attacks.

«Common sense must prevail, and the U.S. must move to a world where the use of nuclear weapons is less likely, not more likely,» said Beatrice Fihn, executive director of the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN), in a statement.

«There is something seriously wrong with an administration who thinks the unilateral power for one person to end the world is somehow not enough power.»—Beatrice Fihn, ICAN

«They are winding the Doomsday Clock in the wrong direction,» she added, referring to the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists» symbolic measure of humanity’s proximity to nuclear  catastrophe.

The draft was released after months of escalating tensions between the U.S. and North Korea over the latter’s reported nuclear activities. Amid calls from nuclear policy experts to bring Kim Jong-un’s government to the negotiating table, President Donald Trump has responded to reports of nuclear tests by North Korea by threatening to «totally destroy» the country of 25 million people, while taunting Kim on social media.

While the U.S. and Russia hold about 93 percent of the world’s nuclear weapons, according to the Ploughshares Fund, Trump has repeatedly attacked previous administrations for allowing North Korea to proliferate nuclear weapons at all.

Meanwhile, the Nuclear Posture Review draft suggests that the U.S. is searching for ways to increase its already-significant advantage over the small, isolated country.

«These new leaks from the Pentagon show they are trying to make it easier for Donald Trump to use nuclear weapons,» said Fihn. «Does anybody seriously think it was not easy enough already? There is something seriously wrong with an administration who thinks the unilateral power for one person to end the world is somehow not enough power.»


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Nuclear Annihilation and the Wisdom of Mass Salvation

Mutually assured destruction is not wisdom. It’s playing with global holocaust.

The Atlantic, in an article about the Hawaii false alarm, quoted one scholar’s tweet of a possible scenario: “POTUS sees alert on his phone about an incoming toward Hawaii, pulls out the biscuit, turns to his military aide with the football and issues a valid and authentic order to launch nuclear weapons at North Korea. Think it can’t happen?” (Image:  tofoli.douglas/flickr/public domain)

Incoming! Incoming!

 

Uh . . . pardon me while I interrupt this false alarm to quote Martin Luther King:

“Science investigates,” he says in The Strength To Love, “religion interprets. Science gives man knowledge, which is power; religion gives man wisdom, which is control. Science deals mainly with facts; religion deals mainly with values. The two are not rivals.”

These words stopped me in my tracks on MLK Day. They seemed to fill a hole in the breaking news, which never quite manages to balance power with wisdom, or even acknowledge the distinction.

Our relationship to power is unquestioned, e.g.: “In the United States itself, there are around [nuclear] 4,500 warheads, of which approximately 1,740 are deployed,” Karthika Sasikumar writes at the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists. “Even more worrying, around 900 of these are on hair-trigger alert, which means that they could be launched within 10 minutes of receiving a warning (which could turn out to be a false alarm). . . .

“The threat to the United States is very real, but fattening the nuclear arsenal is not a rational response. The United States already has 100 times as many warheads as North Korea. . . .”

The U.S. has enormous power, but so what? Such data is almost never addressed in the mainstream media — certainly not in the context of . . . disarmament. That concept is sealed shut, barred from the consciousness of generals and news anchors. Certainly it didn’t come up in the coverage of what happened last Saturday in Hawaii, when an employee of the Hawaii Emergency Management Agency hit the wrong link on his computer screen during a shift change and an incoming-missile alert went statewide, throwing residents and tourists into 38 minutes of panic: “Children going down manholes, stores closing their doors to those seeking shelter and cars driving at high speeds . . .”

Nor did it come up three days later, when a false missile alert went off in Japan, a country with a few memories of the real thing: “Within 10 seconds the fire that wiped out the city came after us at full speed. Everyone was naked. Bodies were swelling up. Some people were so deformed I couldn’t tell if they were male or female. People died screaming, ‘Please give me water!’”

So said Emiko Okada, who was a little girl living with her family on the outskirts of Hiroshima on Aug. 6, 1945. Her older sister, who had just left for school, disappeared that morning and was never seen again. Emiko tells her story in the remarkable 2010 documentary Atomic Mom.

In a column I wrote about the movie at the time, I asked: “What if schoolchildren stood facing not the American flag every morning before class started but a photograph of a devastated Hiroshima, shortly after it was obliterated by our atomic bomb, and pledged their allegiance to the idea that such a thing will never happen again?”

What, I wondered, if we started facing our fears instead of living in fear? To do so, we have to find wisdom in the maw of power.

What we find instead is a president who shook up the whole planet when he called Haiti and the countries of Africa shithole nations — managing, as far as I can tell, to make the word “shithole” far more acceptable to utter in public than “disarmament.”

But the monstrousness of the word isn’t that it used to be obscene, but rather that it does what so many other words do: renders a segment of humanity soulless: the enemy, and therefore expendable. Japan is now our ally, but when we nuked Hiroshima and Nagasaki, its people were Japs or Nips and without value.

Is not the first step toward wisdom when it comes to a world still preposterously armed with weapons of mass destruction a national and international commitment never to dehumanize a living soul? With such a commitment in place, the obvious next step is committing never to launch a nuclear weapon, and therefore agreeing to get rid of the ones we have and, of course, refraining from developing new, more “usable” generations of nukes.

To put it another way, mutually assured destruction is not wisdom. It’s playing with global holocaust, an outcome that may be beyond the ability of anyone, at least anyone who is not a hibakusha — an atomic bomb survivor — to imagine. Free of such paralyzing awareness, national leaders postulate how they would retaliate if attacked, as though a counterattack, killing millions more people, is in any way a sane response to a nuclear attack (or apparent attack).

The Atlantic, in an article about the Hawaii false alarm, quoted one scholar’s tweet of a possible scenario: “POTUS sees alert on his phone about an incoming toward Hawaii, pulls out the biscuit, turns to his military aide with the football and issues a valid and authentic order to launch nuclear weapons at North Korea. Think it can’t happen?”

Come on. With this president?

I think it’s time to free MLK from his day of honor and put him back at the center of the national news.

Robert C. Koehler

Robert Koehler is an award-winning, Chicago-based journalist and nationally syndicated writer. His new book, Courage Grows Strong at the Wound is now available. Contact him at koehlercw@gmail.com or visit his website at commonwonders.com.


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OOOPS: «Ballistic Missile Threat Inbound to Hawaii…This is Not a Drill»

Hawaii Congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard tweeted that it was a false alarm.

This is Not a DrillThis is Not a Drill

DEVELOPING…

Full-blown panic, chaos and rage are being reported after all Hawaiians received emergency alerts on their cell phones, televisions and radios Saturday morning warning that a ballistic missile attack was imminent.

Hawaii Congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard tweeted that it was a false alarm.

President Trump was golfing at his Trump National Golf Club in Florida near his Mar-a-Lago estate when the alert was sent.

Congresswoman Gabbard told MSNBC: “Our leaders have failed us. Donald Trump is taking too long. He’s not taking this threat seriously … This is literally life and death that is at stake.”

“The people of Hawaii just got a taste of the stark reality of what we face here of a potential nuclear strike on Hawaii,» Gabbard said during a phone interview on CNN minutes after the alert was broadcast across the islands. “This is a real threat facing Hawaii,» she said.

There was no follow-up text saying it was a false alarm until 38 minutes after the original alert.

Hawaiian Governor David Ige told CNN that someone had “pressed the wrong button” during a shift change at the Hawaii Emergency Management Agency.

Patrick Granfield, a former strategic communications director at the Pentagon under President Obama tweeted “thank God the President was playing golf.” Granfield posted the tweet after Hawaii officials declared the emergency alert was a false alarm.

Thank God the President was playing golf.

 

Jan 15

Jan 15

The alert system was activated by a dropdown with “test missile alert” and “missile alert” next to each other. Confusing labeling aside, this is an example of ’s UI axiom (paraphrased) “Don’t put the ejection seat button near less consequential stuff.”

Jan 14

If you think Hawaii’s Emergency Management System is bad, you should see their Birth Certificate System.

 

About ivarjordre

painter, activist, writer, revolutionary, human
Dette innlegget vart posta under Imperialism, Our global world, Politic&Society og merkt , , , , , , , , . Bokmerk permalenkja.

1 Response to Nuclear Doomsday Clock- Trigged by «Genius» MAD (Monstrous Atomic Drop Out) People!

  1. Dette kan ta nattesøvnen fra enhver:-(

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